1984 Thesis Statement Power

1984 Thesis Statement Power-83
The narrator, however, also shows a misogynistic world view, one that is often present in dystopian novels, in which women are unimportant and inferior, ‘either sexless automatons or rebels who’ve defied the sex rules of the regime’ (Atwood 516).As Daphne Patai has asserted, this is quite hypocritical: ‘Orwell assails Big Brother’s domination [of the state] but never notices that he is the perfect embodiment of hypertrophied masculinity’ (Patai, Despair 88): the narrator never ‘focuses on male power over females’ (93).

The narrator, however, also shows a misogynistic world view, one that is often present in dystopian novels, in which women are unimportant and inferior, ‘either sexless automatons or rebels who’ve defied the sex rules of the regime’ (Atwood 516).

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‘Big Brother’, as everyone knows, ‘Is Watching’ (3).

It is generally thought that by depicting this grim dystopian world Orwell meant to criticize totalitarian regimes, and that he succeeded very well at this.

Possibly even cheated out of a sense of masculinity that might come with having sex with a young woman like Julia.

It seems that the only reason Winston wants ‘a woman of his own’ (71) is for her body, and the politics that come with it.

Presumably — since he had sometimes seen her with oily hands and carrying a spanner — she had some mechanical job on one of the novel-writing-machines.

She was a bold-looking girl, of about twenty-seven, with thick dark hair, a freckled face and swift, athletic movements.This can be harmful, because it means that the narrator doesn’t just ignore gender inequality, but actually perpetuates it.starts with a third person narrator introducing the main character, Winston Smith, and his world.From the very first page, this narrator is constantly switching between what seem to be facts — the poster on the wall says BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the lift seldom works, Winston is thirty-nine and has a varicose ulcer above his right ankle — and Winston’s opinions.This means it’s difficult to tell whether the hallway “actually” ‘smelt like boiled cabbage and old rag mats’, or if that is Winston focalising, and who exactly describes Big Brother as having ‘ruggedly handsome features’ (3).The use of free indirect discourse (‘It was no use trying the lift’) ensures, like in many other books, that the main character’s focalisation is easily overlooked and taken as the truth.But this particular girl gave him the impression of being more dangerous than most.(11–2)The narrator seamlessly switches between a third person narration and FID focalised by Winston.The women that Winston-narrator describes are all empty-minded and full of party slogans: they are either like his wife ‘The Human Soundtrack’ (Orwell 69), the proles, whom he at some point watches ‘disgustedly’ (73), prostitutes, or they are self-effacing maternal figures: even when seen positively women are stereotypes (Patai, Despair 88).‘Women are at the margins’, and ‘exist mainly as a source of frustration, irritation, or temptation’ (Bail 215).When he gets Julia’s ‘I love you’-note, he is solely concerned about losing her ‘white youthful body’ if he doesn’t reply (115), and later on he gets ‘violently angry’ when Julia is menstruating because he feels like she is cheating him out of something he doesn’t just want desperately, but actually ‘ha[s] a right to’ (145–6).Curious to note here, too, as both Patai (Mystique 247) and Tirohl (58–9) have done, is that Julia and Winston apparently only meet up to have sex.

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